Medical Alphabet

#1
medical-alphabet_o_1986421.jpg


I found this image on the net and I liked it a lot because it made me remember all the written instructions I received from doctors, when I was sick or some of my relatives and I understand why I did not understand those notes, they have a specific alphabet, that is not the same one that we use the rest of the mortals ... hahaha ...

Here I leave this image to serve in their next translations from medical language to English ... hahaha ...
 
#2
This jargon was formulated so that if any doctor makes a mistake other people will not understand but other doctors. Before diagnosis was made through the symptoms you told to the doctors. No proper examination was done.

There are some ailments with similar symptoms. A dictor may be treating malaria but the patient is suffering from amoebiasis or typhoid. They have similar symptoms. The jargon was to hide such.
 
#3
I found this image on the net and I liked it a lot because it made me remember all the written instructions I received from doctors, when I was sick or some of my relatives and I understand why I did not understand those notes, they have a specific alphabet, that is not the same one that we use the rest of the mortals ... hahaha ...
Oh my god, the sad thing is that this isn't far fetched at all. I remember when I was younger there were times when I got prescribed antibiotics and some other things and I couldn't even read what the suggested dose was that was written on the package. I had to go on the internet and go by what people said there as well as reading the manual and then I just tried to guess the correct number.
 
#4
Can't imagine how doctoral students acquire this kind of handwriting. How amusing it is if they do really have a specific class to learn it. And if they do, it is so unusual that there's a profession that requires a skill to be un good in penmanship. :geek:

Another strange thing, the other class is studying on how to read doctor's prescription. Thanks to the Pharmacist who help us not to read but to have the right medicine to take. You're awesome! (y)
 
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Aeolos

New member
#5
I can relate to this as someone who have a really bad hand writing although I am not a doctor. I'm an engineering student and my friends keep asking me if have really taken the right program. They really had a hard time copying my answers and my notes during class. They already tag this meme to me and it was really hilarious.
 

nebur

New member
#6
Until now I still don't understand why all the doctors have that kind of hand writing . I mean are they doing that to confuse us or they are doing that because they are always in a hurry. My biggest question is how come that the Pharmacist understand everything in that kind of writing ? haha
 
#7
Up to now I have never been to a medical professional I mean a doctor who can write the stuff I understand. Do they get extra training for it , to write something totally unique that no one else than the doctors can understand. I mean , is their study that much tough that converts the smooth writing into zigzag roads? It is always a resilient job to me whenever someone ask me to read or make him understand the prescription doctors written to him. I myself studying degree of medical field but this thing sucks.
 
#8
This is an art for all healthcare profession, but looking at the medical alphabet now.. I realized that I'm not really a fan of art, hehe! :p
 
#9
I think it has something to do with doctors always being in a hurry. They never seem to run out of paitents. So they scribble as fast as they can to save time. I have never seen any doctor's writing that I could completely understand. Many people with poor handwriting make good doctors.
 
#10
Hahaha! Is it just me or are all the letters looks the same? But it's not for me to judge. Doctors really have talent for this. One time I ask a doctor if he is using some code or something but he said that "I just right the name of the medicine. Just give it to the pharmacist she knows what's this." and I was like, "O-Okay Doctor." The bottom line of that scenario was how did the pharmacist even understand the writings? It's still a mystery for me. A full respect for all the pharmacist out there.
 
#11
I think everyone has the same problem everytime a doctor prescribed some meds after a certain check up. Its so difficult to read and sometimes you are even intimidated to ask the doctor to read everything that she/he listed back to you. Do they really study that type of writing? In my opinion, they need to have it simplified. Would you agree?
 

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